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How Long Does an Appeal Take for Disability?

Embarking on the journey to secure disability benefits can be challenging, especially when faced with initial denials. If you've found yourself among the 65 percent of applicants who face this setback, the road to appeal becomes a crucial part of the process. Ever wondered about the time it takes to navigate through a disability appeal? Let's explore the timeline and how having a disability lawyer by your side can make a significant difference. The Importance of a Disability Lawyer Filing...

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UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE

The unemployment insurance program pays money to workers who lose their jobs through no fault of their own. Am I eligible for...

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CALCULATE SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS

The retirement benefit calculator provides estimates based on the information on your #SocialSecurity earnings record. It is important to note that there...

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APPROVAL FOR DISABILITY BENEFITS

The Social Security Administration provides disability benefits to American workers who are unable to work for a period of more than 12 months due to physical, mental, or emotional illness. If the case meets the #SSA program requirements, it can reduce the case evaluation time to just a few weeks. The program includes a list of illnesses which you must consult and identify if any of them correspond to your illness, this way the approval for the program will be...

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NUMBER OF CREDITS FOR THE RIGHT TO RETIREMENT

The credits are the bases we use to find out if you have the minimum amount of work to be entitled to the different types of #SocialSecurity benefits. For most people, the minimum amount is 40 credits. If you stop working before you have the minimum number of credits, they will accumulate in your record. If you do not have enough credits, benefits cannot be paid to you. If you do not have at least 40 credits, you are not...

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HOW CAN SOCIAL SECURITY HELP WHEN A FAMILY MEMBER DIES?

The first thing you should do is report the death to the US Social Security Administration (SSA), which is the agency responsible for processing death reports for Social Security and Medicare beneficiaries. Not reporting the death of a person and continuing to use the benefits that person received is considered fraud. Data you need to report in the event of a death of a beneficiary: Provide the deceased person’s  Social Security number to the funeral director where the funeral services...

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PUBLIC HOUSING SUPPORT PROGRAM QUESTIONS

Once you understand the HUD public housing support program and what it consists of, some questions may arise that will be followed up on: Who qualifies? Public housing is only for low-income families and individuals. A local housing agency determines if you qualify based on: Your annual gross income If you qualify as elderly, disabled or family Your citizenship or eligible immigration status. If you qualify, the housing agency will check your references to make sure you and your family...

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BENEFITS FOR THE EDUCATION OF MILITARY, VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES

Active duty military members can pursue higher education during their spare time and request that their branch of the Armed Forces finance the costs. Find out how the Military Student Aid Program works on the website: https://www.dodmou.com/ The Military Tuition Assistance program may be the benefit you need, it is available to active duty members in the National Guard and the reserve component. Use the tool and decide your financial aid program for higher education, to make the best use...

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WHAT TYPES OF MEDICAL PROBLEMS ARE SERIOUS ENOUGH TO HAVE A DISABILITY

There is no magic list of medical conditions that may cause a disability. Technically, any condition that is severe enough to interfere with a person's ability to work can be disabling. For example, cancer or HIV/AIDS or any other life-threatening condition are not automatically disabling conditions, nor are common conditions like high blood pressure and diabetes automatic losers. Almost any condition, if severe enough, can be disabling, what is important is how the medical condition affects your ability to work...

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Client Testimonials

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This case was my first time hiring a lawyer but I am glad that the attorney I chose worked diligently with me to help me get the results I was looking for. I am confident in letting the law offices of Gerard Lynch handle my business when needed, and I will be contacting this office when or is there is another matter that I need handled. I, Alexander Foster, am very satisfied with the outcome of my case. The Law Office of Gerard Lynch and I worked together and we achieved the goal that we were striving for. I am so thankful.

Alexander Foster,
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The best and foremost compliment I can give this firm is the fact that I didn't have to come in to the office and overall my case was handled very expeditiously. Thanks for a job well done on my behalf.

Kathy Brown,
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We need more lawyers like Mr. Lynch with an understanding heart and mind. May God bless you and your staff. I enjoyed working with Mr. Lynch and thank you so very much.

M. Robertson,

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I have to be disabled permanently to receive Social Security Disability (SSD)?

No you do not. A claimant needs to be disabled for at least 12 months or have a medical condition that is terminal or expected to lead to death. Sometimes a claimant is not disabled permanently but has a certain time frame in which they are disabled from working. For example, a claimant may get into a car accident, need to have multiple surgeries and is out of work for at least one year. That claimant can receive benefits for the period before he or she returned back to work.

It is possible but rare. In a SSD case, medical records are your evidence and that is the proof you have to show the SSA and an social security judge that you do have a severe medical condition that keeps you from working. If you do not have recent medical records, it is much harder to win a case. There is a possibility, though not common, that your case might be approved simply by going to a consultative exam that SSA sends you to, where a doctor gives you a physical or mental examination.

One benefit of working with our office is that we will look carefully at your case and if you do not have enough or current medical records, we can often give you information about low-income or indigent health services where you can go and get medical treatment for free or greatly reduced cost.

Our law firm, the Law Office of Gerard Lynch, only charges our clients if we win their SSD or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. We charge on a contingency basis, 25% of the backpay, a cap of up to $6000, awarded to a claimant when we win the case. The fees are regulated by the Social Security Administration (SSA). If we do not win their case, we do not charge anything no matter how much work we have done. Once a client wins and their monthly checks begin, they will keep 100% of their checks.

Social Security Disability (SSD) comes from FICA taxes that are deducted from paychecks during the work history of a person. Every month that a person works and reports income to the government, taxes are deducted which are paid into social security. When FICA taxes are taken out of paychecks, most of it goes into the social security retirement fund. However, a smaller portion goes into the social security disability fund. People who become disabled over their lifetime and are not yet eligible to get their full age retirement benefits can get benefits from the disability fund. One difference between Social Security Disability (SSD) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is that Social Security Disability (SSD) is like social security retirement – it does not matter how much money a person has or how many assets they have.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a different program for disabled people and it is like a form of welfare. Like food stamps, if you have too much money, assets or property, then you will be ineligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) even if you are clearly disabled. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is for people who are either too young to have paid enough into the system or have not worked recently enough to receive Social Security Disability (SSD). The benefits given to Supplemental Security Income (SSI) claimants come from the general US government fund. To receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI), a claimant has to be equally disabled to a person who receives Social Security Disability (SSD) – the standard for determining disability are the same. The only difference in deciding which claimant receives Social Security Disability (SSD) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) comes from the amount of money paid into the social security system over one’s lifetime.